Banned Amazon Keywords

There are many banned words for Amazon keywords, mostly in the erotica category. Don’t run afoul of Amazon, like all large companies there is very little recourse for people who are the victim of an erroneous ban, unless you have a multi-million dollar account of course.

If your account is banned, not only do you lose all your books on that account with no ability to re-upload them on another account, you also lose the royalties already earned – this means if you make $20k in January, and 50k in February, and you’re banned in March, you will receive all of $0. They will keep it all, and you explicitly agreed to it in their terms when you signed up.

This is true whether it’s your fault or not.

Amazon also regularly pulls entire catalogs, for violations on a single book.

The first words to avoid are trademarked terms. These can be very spottily enforced by Amazon, but make absolutely no mistake – if you get too comfortable and start abusing trademarked keywords to get more views on your book, when they do find out they will ban you and there will be no sympathy, as it’s the type of basic good practice they expect even the smallest author to follow. If you have a fantasy magic book targeted towards children, don’t you dare slip “Harry Potter” in those keywords. Seriously, you’re not the first person to get that brilliant idea, but sadly it’s strictly forbidden.

Besides trademarked terms, don’t abuse Amazon terms. As you search our Keyword Nerve Center, you might be surprised to see how many of Amazon’s real searches have “Kindle Unlimited” or another of Kindle’s programs in the search term. If your book really is in Kindle Unlimited, there’s absolutely no issue with slipping Kindle Unlimited into your keywords, right? Wrong, very wrong. Any Amazon specific keyword should be avoided, since Amazon can change it’s mind pretty quick on this, as many people who had to update their keywords to remove Kindle Unlimited found out upon receiving the mass warning Amazon sent out.

Forbidden words includes “Amazon,” “Kindle,” “KDP Select,” “Kindle Unlimited,” “Best Seller,” and even “Free.” Straight from the horses mouth, the following are banned:

Unauthorized reference to other titles or authors

Unauthorized reference to a trademarked term

Reference to sales rank (e.g., “bestselling”)

Reference to advertisements or promotions (e.g., “free”)

You should also avoid putting your pen name in the subtitle, or keywords. Amazon had this to say about it when an individual complained, after his book was banned for just that.

As stated in our Metadata Guidelines (httpss://kdp.amazon.com/self-publishing/help?topicId=A294SHSUYLKTA6), search keywords that are not accurate descriptors of a book’s central storyline or are completely unrelated to its content may be misleading to our customers and are unacceptable. Misleading search keywords, such as reference to other authors or titles, result in confusion for customers as to why the work is included in search results. To that end, authors may be asked to remove misleading terms from their book’s search keyword fields so that we can ensure the keywords do not lead to inaccurate or overwhelming search results or impair our readers’ ability to make good buying decisions. If no changes are made to the book’s search keyword fields, the book may be removed from sale. In all cases of book removal, the author is notified. Our team is looking into any technical issues that occurred during our notification to you. If we determine an error in our messaging system, all authors impacted will be notified immediately.

Don’t think your descriptions are a free for all, either. From Amazon:

Entice readers with a summary of the story and characters. Don’t give away anything that adds to the suspense or surprise. Let readers know what makes your book interesting, and give them a sense of what kind of book it is. If you’re stuck, check the back covers (or inner dust jacket flaps) of books you like for general ideas, or ask someone you trust how they describe your book when people ask about it.

We prohibit including any of the items below in your description:

Pornographic, obscene, or offensive content

Phone numbers, physical mail addresses, email addresses, or website URLs

Availability, price, alternative ordering information (such as links to other websites for placing orders)

Time-sensitive information (e.g., dates of promotional tours, seminars, lectures, etc.)

Any keywords or tags

Finally, there are normal keywords that are simply banned. These are words that are too abrasive for the general population to stumble upon, and you should never include these in your keywords or titles or subtitles.

Abduct / abduction

Back Door

Bang

Banging

Blowjob

Breast, breasts (Banned in title, not keywords)

Breeding, Breed, Bred, Breeder

Brother

Choked

Daddy / Dad

Dubcon

Family

Father

Forced / Force / Forces

Gangbang

Girl / Boy

Hypnosis / Hypnotize

Incest

Knocked up/Knocking up

Lactation

Little

Niece

NonConsent

Orgy

Profanity

Rape

Siblings

Sister

Slave

Sleep Sex

Sodomize/d

Step-Whatever (Banned in erotica, not romance)

Uncle

Violate

Virgin / Virginity

[We think] Word’s that will increase the chance of an adult title or additional review:

Alcohol / Drunk

Anal

Ass / Asshole

Baby

Babysitter

Bareback

Barely Legal

Cheerleader

Cum/ming

Deflowered

Drugs / Drugged

Dubious

Filled

Milk / Milked / Milking

Mom

Mother

Pregnancy / Pregnant / Impregnate

Reluctant

Slut / Slutty

Stepbrother

Stepmother

Young / Younger

Unprotected, no protection

Warning (As in TRIGGER WARNING or WARNING ADULT)

Not mentioned but still banned: Generally any word that describes an illegal sex act will not be allowed, and as the word’s disturb me I’m not going to bother listing them here. This is obvious, I’m sure, so I don’t need to tell you this.

So, you’ve finished a romance or erotica book and it’s main keyword is banned. What to do? As long as it is not describing a sex act that is illegal in real life, you can generally still sell it, and in fact the top 100 erotica is full of content that has frowned upon keywords.

As an example of common work arounds:

Incest MUST be step-brother, step-sister, etc. If you have no banned keywords, your book will still be banned, because they are quite serious about this.

Incest = Taboo

Father = Man Of The House

Mother = Woman Of The House

Daughter = Precious Girl

Instead of Hypnosis, “In A Trance” etc

You get the idea. This requires some creativity, and it’s better to err on the side of caution. Anyone searching for a fetish book that you wrote will generally find it, don’t be stupid and try to push in something blatantly unacceptable by Amazon’s standards. You would just be working hard to earn yourself a ban.

Check this page frequently for updates, go over your keywords and descriptions with a fine tooth comb, and go forth and sell millions of books! Don’t let a mistake define you. Your mistakes don’t make you, or break you.

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